Letter J: Alphabet Activities for Kids

Letter J Alphabet Activities from Roaming Rosie

Welcome to Letter J Day!

If you haven’t read the Introduction to the Alphabet Activities, you should start there.

Don’t forget to check out the Letter J:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids, too!

Here are all the activities we did:

J is for Jellyfish Alphabet Activities from Roaming Rosie

First, as always, we did our construction paper craft.  But instead of one big letter that we decorated, we did a bunch of little letters.

I had cut out a pile of Letter Js and a rounded top so that my kids could make their own jellyfish with the letters as tentacles.

And googly eyes.  I swear they get more excited about the letters that need eyes…

J is for Jack o Lanters Letter Sorting Alphabet Activities from Roaming Rosie

Then for our Letter Sorting activity, where they needed to separate out the capital and lowercase letters, I went with jack o’ lanterns.

My kids were still kind of little at this point in out Alphabet Activities, so I had cut out the pumpkins and faces ahead of time and all they did was glue the finished jack o’ lantern to the paper before gluing on the letters.

Now that they’re older, I might still have cut out the face pieces but I would have let them make the faces themselves first, probably from a selection of eyes and mouths.

J is for Jump Alphabet Activities from Roaming Rosie

Back to the chalk!

I love that my girls love being outdoors, so chalk letters are great way to get them moving.

I drew a bunch of big Letter Js to represent the word “jump.”  And then we did just that – jump from J to J.

J is for Jell-O Sensory Bin Alphabet Activities from Roaming Rosie

This was a TON of fun for my girls.

The night before Letter J Day, I made a couple of boxes of Jell-O in a big plastic bin and I threw a bunch of toys into it that started with the Letter J.

I didn’t get all fancy with worrying about where the toys would stay once the Jell-O solidified.  I just tossed ’em in.  Most of the toys floated to the top, but they were still partially submerged and, thus, still had to be dug out by little fingers that were eager to get messy.

J is for Jello Sensory Bin Alphabet Activities from Roaming Rosie

We did it outside to keep the mess out of the house, but I suppose you could do it on a tile floor somewhere if you covered it in a tarp or with a tablecloth.

We made a pile of the toys in another bin (the sand castle-shaped container you see at the bottom), and then we rinsed off everything with the hose when we were done.

The toys we used were probably ones I found in the dollar store, but here are some examples of the plastic Jet party favors, craft Jewels, and plastic Jacks that are similar to what is pictured above.

I would check the party sections of your local store for similar items that are sold as party favors, and the craft section for the jewels.

J is for Jelly Beans Alphabet Activities from Roaming Rosie

We did a few worksheets, as always.  There were my typical letter searches and mazes and such, but the jelly bean ones were the favorites of the day.

I wonder why….. (nom, nom, nom)

You can find these jelly bean worksheets, along with others, on my Letter J:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids post.

J is also for Juggling!

So we watched the video above, which my girls love because they enjoy watching kids doing things (plus he’s really good), and then we tried juggling with some light balls we had around the house.

We weren’t terribly successful, except at producing lots of giggles.  :)

J is for Jelly Toast Alphabet Activities from Roaming Rosie

Gotta love jelly toast!

I cut out the J shapes with our letter cookie cutters, then slathered the toast in some butter and strawberry jelly.

J is for Jamaican Jerk Chicken Alphabet Activities from Roaming Rosie

I didn’t want to make a big, complicated dinner in between our projects, so I kept things simple with this chicken.

I marinated a package of boneless thighs in some Jamaican Jerk Marinade that I picked up in the supermarket and threw them on a grill pan.  Easy Peasy.  (Don’t forget to have the Little Ones seek out the Letter J on the bottle of marinade!)

That’s it for Letter J!  Except for the free printable worksheets I made, which you can get here:

Letter J: Free Alphabet Worksheets

I’d love for you to share if you’ve done any of these projects with your little ones!

Follow me on Facebook and Twitter and Pinterest to see my latest posts.

Have fun!

Roaming Rosie Signature

Advertisements

Construction Paper Mummies Halloween Craft

Halloween Construction Paper Mummy 1

Another project we had some fun with around Halloween was making some Construction Paper Mummies.

These were great for letting the girls get creative with patterns.

Halloween Construction Paper Mummy 2

While they were in school I cut out some basic body shapes out of black paper and some strips of white paper that were only about as wide as the body.

You could also let your kids do this part, if you prefer.

Halloween Construction Paper Mummy 3

Then I just handed over some glue and some googly eyes and let them go to town.

We did it on an opened Whole Foods bag, to keep the extra glue off the floor.  And they used their scissors to trim down some of the white strips too.

Halloween Construction Paper Mummy 4

My girls also decided they’d like to color the mummies, so we pulled out some colored pencils.

Ignore the golf ball, tho.  I don’t know how that ended up there.  :)

Happy Crafting!

Roaming Rosie Signature

Letter G: Alphabet Activities for Kids

Alphabet Activites for Kids:  Letter G {Learning the Alphabet with Roaming Rosie}

Welcome to Letter G Day!

If you haven’t read the Introduction to the Alphabet Activities, you should start there.

Don’t forget to check out the Letter G:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids, too!

G is for Giraffe paper craft {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

For our construction paper letter, we made a giraffe with a letter G body, four legs with attached feet and a little head I had cut out.

I used a hole punch to make a bunch of “spots” out of brown paper, which was a lot of fun to attach.  One of these days I may even remember to buy and easier-to-use hole punch so my daughter can help me out with things like this!

G is for Guitars letter sorting paper craft  {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

For our letter sorting, I made two guitars, and my daughter placed the lowercase Gs on one and the uppercase on the other.

I later realized this would have looked better if I’d cut out the Gs as little music notes.  Next time.

G is for Green Glitter printable worksheet {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

Is there anything better than glitter?

Not if you’re a toddler/preschooler/anybody!

The supplies for this included glue and green glitter.  Easy + fun = awesome!

You can print the worksheet from my post Letter G: Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids

G is for Green Grass printable worksheet {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

For this I cut a bunch of small pieces of “grass” out of construction paper ahead of time, that my daughter attached with glue.

But later, I let her use her little scissors to practice cutting grass, which we used for a different project.

You can print the worksheet from my post Letter G: Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids

G is for Green Goo {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

It’s GOOOOOOOOO!

This stuff is great.  And boy, did my girls love playing with it!

It’s a little wet at first, but it dries out pretty quickly.  Either way, I don’t advise playing with it on carpet.

And you can store it in a closed container for awhile.  Depending on how much time they spend playing with it each time you take it out of the container, it might last a few weeks.

G is for Green Goo {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

The recipe is easy, although you may have to help your Little Ones squeeze out ALL of the glue.

You’ll need:

1.  8 oz. white glue {we used 2-4 oz. bottles of Elmer’s}

2.  1 teaspoon Borax {found in the laundry detergent aisle}

3.  food coloring {optional}

4.  water

First, empty the glue into a large bowl.  Add a tablespoon or so of water to the glue bottle and shake it well to help loosen the rest of the glue.  Pour that into the bowl, too.  Stir in some food coloring.

Mix the Borax with 1/2 cup warm water until dissolved, then add it into the glue and stir.

This will produce a slimy substance within a puddle of water.  Pull the goo out of the water and knead it a bit to squeeze out some of the excess water.

It’s pretty much done at this point.  A little more water will probably leak out as the kids start to play with it, so I suggest playing on a mat or plastic tablecloth or something similar the first time, to help catch the extra water.

We stored ours for a few weeks, playing with it now and then.  After a while, it became stiffer and pieces would break off that we could then knead back into it.  But my girls enjoyed both the slimy and stiffer versions.

G is for Green Glitter Goo {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

Green Glitter Goo is a combination of

1.  clear hair gel {from the dollar store}

2.  green glitter {sometimes available at the dollar store}

3.  a few drops of green food coloring {optional}

Mix up all that stuff in a plastic gallon-size freezer baggy {freezer bags are sturdier} and let the kids go at it.  We traced all kinds of letters and shapes in the goo.

It lasted quite a while, too, before I even worried about it leaking.  Just make sure no one jumps on it or anything, and it should last at least a few weeks, if not more.

G is for Gears  {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

They spent some time playing with their Melissa & Doug Caterpillar Gear Toy. 

While they were playing, we talked about how gears starts with the letter G.

G is for Gardening with Grandma {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

My girls do a LOT of gardening with Grandma.

Today we pointed out how all of those words start with G.

G is for Gnocchi with Garlic and Gruyere {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

For dinner, we made some Gnocchi.  I love me some gnocchi.

Anyway, since it was letter G day, we made it with Gruyere and garlic.

My girls like to help with shredding the cheese – at least for a minute or two – and also with using the garlic press.

G is for Gnocchi {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

Gnocchi with Garlic and Gruyere

Ingredients:

1 lb. gnocchi
6 oz. shredded Gruyere cheese
2 to 4 cloves pressed or diced garlic
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons flour
1 cup milk

In a small saucepan, melt the butter. Add the flour and stir until smooth.
Add the garlic and let cook on low for a few minutes. Don’t let it burn because it will become bitter.

Add the milk and let it come just to a boil over medium to high heat, stirring occasionally. As soon as it starts to bubble, stir in the cheese (except for a handful) and turn to low.

Cook the gnocchi according to directions in a separate pot. Once done, drain and stir into cheese sauce.

Place in a serving bowl and top with reserved cheese.

Note: the garlic taste is strong. If you don’t like garlic, you can reduce the amount or omit it altogether.

Here is the free printable PDF of the recipe:

Gnocchi with Garlic and Gruyere

G is for Ginger Spice Cookies {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

I loooooove spice cookies!

SO much awesome food at one time!

Anyway… we used my Norwegian Spice Cookie recipe, but added in some extra ginger in the form of ginger crystals.

I liked the taste of the extra ginger, although I’ll probably just stick to the normal recipe when I usually make them in the future.

If you want to add in a little crystallized ginger, crush it up a little and throw about a tablespoon or two in when mixing in the other spices.

And, as you can see in the photo below, we not only made traditional gingerbread men, but also some letter Gs with out alphabet cookie cutters.

G is for Ginger Spice Cookies {Alphabet Activities for Kids at Roaming Rosie}

I’d love for you to share if you’ve done any of these projects with your little ones!

Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook and Pinterest to see all of our latest crafts and recipes!

Have fun!

Roaming Rosie Signature

“Chalkboard” Valentine’s Day Hearts

"Chalkboard" Valentine's Day Hearts Activity for Kids

This is a fun little activity I did with my girls to celebrate Valentine’s Day.

I cut some hearts out of black construction paper and drew on them with white and silver colored pencils to show my girls how it looked.

The fun mini hearts look like little chalkboards and my girls were delighted with how the light colors looked so vibrant on the dark hearts.

They spent quite a while drawing on the hearts and experimenting with different colors {though mostly after I took the photograph}.

The picture shows just a few of the hearts, but one of the things I also made sure to do was to cut out hearts in varying sizes.

And next time I’ll probably let them help me cut them out, but this time they were too busy coloring.  :)

Roaming Rosie Signature

Paper Heart Hand

Paper Heart Hands

These Paper Heart Hands are such a fun and simple project!

I’ve made quite a few of them with my girls.  They only take a minute and they love to play with them.

What’s really awesome, though, is that they also make great gifts!  You can have the kids decorate them with doodles and stickers and send them in greeting cards to grandparents, aunts and uncles, and friends.  Or the paper hands can BE the greeting card itself.

On that note, they also make great homemade presents for Valentine’s Day or Mother’s / Grandparent’s Day.  But we like to make them every so often just for fun.

Paper Heart Hands

You make them by folding a piece of paper in half and lining up your child’s hand against the folded half, with their thumb and forefinger touching the crease, as shown above.

Trace their hand, or have them trace their own hand, making sure that the tips of their thumb and forefinger overlap with the creased edge.

Paper Heart Hands

Then cut out their hand.  Voila!

The space between the thumb and forefinger is what resembles a heart when you open it up, so try to make your outline of the hand resemble half of a heart in that space when you cut it out.

It’s okay if you’re a little off – like I was in this one.  Some look more like hearts than others.  My girls {and Grandma} love them anyway, even if they’re not perfect.

Paper Heart Hands

And one thing that my daughters love is when I take that “heart” that I cut out of the center of their hands and turn it into a little butterfly with just a few more snips of the scissors.

The “butterfly” is that thing in the photo that looks a bit like a number 8 with a pointy bottom.  Again:  young kids usually aren’t that much of a perfectionist when it comes to crafts.

Anything involving construction paper, scissors, hearts, and – possibly – butterflies is awesome for them.

The best part?  These make amazing homemade Valentine’s Day cards.  They’re easy to color and to decorate with stickers, and you can write a little message inside of them.

Roaming Rosie Signature

Letter E: Alphabet Activities for Kids

Letter E:  Alphabet Activities for Kids at RoamingRosie.com

Welcome to Letter E Day!

If you haven’t read the Introduction to the Alphabet Activities, you should start there.

Don’t forget to check out the Letter E:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids, too!

Letter Sorting:  E is for Easter Eggs {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

For our letter sorting activity, I cut out two egg shapes and added some paper patterns that made them look like Easter eggs.

E is for Electric Eels  {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

For our next Letter E project, I cut out the letter for Eel in squiggly lines that were supposed to represent the animal.

Then my daughter glued them on the water-colored paper and drizzled on some glow-in-the-dark paint.

The glowing version didn’t photograph well, but it was a big hit in person.

E is for Elephants  {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

We made some elephants with grey paint.

My daughter dipped her hands in the paint, then made hand prints on paper.

While the paint was still wet, we added googly eyes and a paper oval ear.

E is for Eyes {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This is one of the worksheets I made that’s available on my Letter E:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids post.

We spread glue all over the letters and added googly eyes.

E is for Earth  {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

Our next project was a coffee filter craft:  E is for Earth.

The coffee filters were pretty big, so I cut it to fit the construction paper.  Then I outlined some shapes in green to roughly represent the continents.

Next, my daughter and I colored the continents and water with washable markers.  I helped a little because she hadn’t filled them all in completely and it looks best with a lot of color.

We took a spray bottle filled with water and squirted the coffee filter.  Make sure you have something underneath it {like newspaper} to soak up any colors that bleed through.  Don’t be afraid to squirt a lot of water of it, so that the colors will run.

Once it dried, we glued it to a piece of black construction paper with glitter to represent outer space and stars.

E is for Electric Eggs Hunt {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

My girls LOVED this.  And it’s very easy to do.

To set up an Electric Egg Hunt {which is also a great Easter activity}, you put bracelet-sized glow sticks inside of plastic Easter eggs.  Then hide them around the room and turn off the lights.

Below you can see my girls finding all the eggs.  One used a basket and the other just made a pile.

We hid them over and over again, so the activity lasted for quite awhile.

And has been requested many times since.

E is for Electric Eggs Hunt {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

E is for Electric Egg Hunt {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

E is for Scrambled Eggs {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

These are scrambled egg Es.  I made some scrambled eggs in a pan and added in some cheese.  I let it sit near the end of cooking it, so that it had the consistency of an omelet instead of scrambled eggs {stuck together instead of falling apart.}

Then I slid it onto a plate and cut out letter Es with a cookie cutter.

E is for Chocolate Eggs {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

These are really cute.

For these miniature eggs, I melted some white candy melts in a little baggy, snipped off the corner, and squeezed out the chocolate in oval shapes onto waxed paper.  Before the chocolate set, I put a yellow M&M on top.

It cools and sets in a few minutes, but they also stay fresh so you can make them days ahead of time, if you want.

E is for Green Eggs {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

And since we also read Green Eggs and Ham for Letter E Day, I added green M&Ms to some of the chocolate eggs.  :)

Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss

E is for Easy Eclairs {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

These were my take on eclairs.  I wanted to bake something, but something that would be really easy to make.

I didn’t post a printable recipe because I just combined a few things to make them.  I DID post a step-by-step photo below, though, to help explain it.

We started with some store-bought pie crust dough.  You can usually find this in the frozen or refrigerated section of the grocery store.  We cut out flower circles with a 2-inch cookie cutter and pressed the small circles of dough into greased mini cupcake pans.  After baking them according to the package directions and letting them fully cool, we spooned in some instant vanilla pudding.  Once that set, we drizzled chocolate fudge ice cream topping over them.

And to review, a list of the ingredients:  pie crust dough, vanilla pudding, fudge ice cream topping.

They might not exactly be eclairs in the traditional sense, but they still tasted pretty good.

E is for Easy Eclairs {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

And here are some of the supplies I’ve mentioned in this post, including glow-in-the-dark paint, googly eyes, plastic eggs, glow sticks for the electric eggs, the cookie cutter set that I used for the scrambled eggs Es and the easy eclairs, and the fudge topping for the eclairs:

Glow in the Dark Paint Plastic Eggs

Glow Stick Bracelets Cookie Cutters Fudge Ice Cream Topping

I’d love for you to share if you’ve done any of these projects with your little ones!

Follow me on Facebook and Pinterest to see my latest posts.

Have fun!

Roaming Rosie Signature

Letter C: Alphabet Activities for Kids

Letter C: Alphabet Activities for Kids at RoamingRosie.com

Welcome to Letter C Day!

If you haven’t read the Introduction to the Alphabet Activities, you should start there.

And don’t forget to check out the Letter C:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids, too!

Letter Sorting: C is for Cars {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

For our letter sorting activity, I made two paper cars.

To make it a little easier to distinguish between the capital and lowercase Cs, I cut out the capital Cs in a slightly bigger circle than the lowercase ones.

But kids tend to be more observant than us anyway, and I’m not sure that extra step was necessary.

C is for Caterpillar {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This paper project goes great with Letter C Day and with a reading of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, which we read anyway.

But instead of cutting out circles for the body of the caterpillar, I cut out large letter Cs in different colors.

C is for Counting Colorful Cats {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This is a file folder-type game that I made.  And it’s one that my daughter still pulls out of the “file folder” game binder to play.

It’s a simple concept of matching the cats that are the same color, but lets you practice counting as well as color matching.

You can find the free printout on my Letter C:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids post.

C is for Cloud Watching {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This was probably my favorite activity.

I know it seems a little strange at first glance – after all, what toddler/preschooler can pronounce “cumulonimbus?”

Honestly, I struggled to say the words, too.

But, with this chart in hand, we lay in the grass and watched the clouds.  We talked about the different shapes and which picture on the chart best matched the clouds we saw.  We picked animals out of the floating masses and laughed as the shapes fell apart again.

My daughter still excitedly points out shapes she sees in the clouds, and her younger sister is starting to, as well.

I made this chart with photos from the NOAA and you can get the free printout on my Letter C:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids post.

C is for Cotton Clouds {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

After watching the clouds outdoors, we made our own.

I cut fluffy cloud shapes out of blue construction paper, which my daughter smeared with glue and covered with cotton balls.

I punched a hole at the top so we could tie a string and hang them in our living room.

C is for Constellations {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This is a great project, and for many ages, too.

The version of constellations you see here was done when my daughter was a toddler.  I made different shapes with glue and she sprinkled the cut out stars over the glue.  The stars were made with a craft punch.

Now that she’s a preschooler, we’ve replicated the project, though a little differently.  She draws the lines with a white or silver crayon on the black construction paper, dotting on glue and paper stars at important points along the path, such as where the lines intersect.

C is for Corn Sensory Bin {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This corn sensory bin was so cool.  Seriously.  Have you ever been to a corn maze where they had a giant sandbox full of corn kernels that you could play in?

This was like the miniature version of that.  With letter C toys to find.

What I’m trying to say is that it felt really neat.  Corn is a great sensory tool because it has a wonderfully soothing feel as you move your hands through it.

And you can reuse it.  This is just popcorn kernels, and we did pop them after the project was done.

The letter C items that I hid in the corn included a toy cookie, cat, car, a coin, some crayons, candles, and clothespins.

C is for Candy Cane Craft {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

The next few crafts work for both Letter C Day and for Christmas Crafts.

For this one, I had precut some candy cane shapes from red construction paper and some strips of white paper.

My daughter glued the candy canes onto the paper and the candy cane strips on top of them.

C is for Chenille Candy Canes {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

I love using chenille {pipe cleaner} sticks for crafts.  Especially since they’re something you can get at the dollar store.

For this one, we took one white and one red pipe cleaner and twisted them together.  Then, we hooked over one end to make the candy cane shape.

Mine is the one on the left and my daughter’s on the right.

If you make these around Christmastime, they make adorable decorations that can be hung on furniture or the tree.

C is for Circle Christmas Trees {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

With this one, we had some discussions not just about the letter C but also about shapes.

I drew a triangle to represent the shape of a Christmas tree on the paper and we filled it with glue.  My daughter filled the triangle with the large green circles for the tree and topped it the the star.

Then we drizzled glue over the tree and she sprinkled on the tiny circles for ornaments.

I cut out the star by hand and the green circles as well.  If you have a large hole punch you could use that instead.  For the small circle ornaments, I used a single hole punch.

And since it was winter, this decorated our fridge before I transferred it to our Alphabet Activity Binder.

C is for Cars Under Cups {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This was a little something we did for fun, after discussing how both of the words Car and Cup start with the letter C.

A variation on a Shell Game, I hid two cars under the three cups, moved them around and asked her to find the cars.  Not much of a challenge since the cups are all different, but it was still fun.  There were lots of giggles.

C is for Cinnamon Toast Cs {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

These adorable Cinnamon Toast Cs were made by cutting the letter C out of Cinnamon Toast with a cookie cutter.

I made the toast with regular sandwich bread, buttered the warm toast and sprinkled it with my Cinnamon Sugar Mix.  Then I pressed in the cookie cutter to get letter C shapes.

And I ate all of the “leftovers.”  Of course.  :)

C is for Carrot Cake Cupcakes {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

These were quick because I used a box mix and store bought icing.  I wanted to focus on the other projects and not baking from scratch – we do that enough on other days.

I made mini cupcakes and topped them with some cream cheese icing that I put in a plastic baggie with the corner snipped off.  I squeezed it on top in circles.

Then I mixed some icing with green food coloring and a little more with orange food coloring.

To make the carrot shapes I took the orange colored icing, also in a small plastic baggie with the corner snipped off, and drew a squiggle pattern that was thicker at one end and slightly pointed at the other.  Then I added a little dab of green icing where the “carrot” was thickest.

C is for Chili Con Carne with Cheese, Sour Cream, & Cornbread {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

For dinner we had a mouthful of letter C:  Chili con Carne with cheese, sour cream, and cornbread.

I made my 4 Ingredient Chili and some cornbread baked in muffin tins.

C is for Chocolate Chip Cookies {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

And chocolate chip cookies.  Yum.  How could we possibly have a day celebrating the letter C and not mention chocolate chip cookies??

C is for Cookie, that’s good enough for me…..

Anyway, while baking your favorite recipe of chocolate chip cookies, melt some chocolate chips in a baggie, snip off the corner, and draw some letter Cs onto waxed or parchment paper.  Allow them to set (this only take a few minutes) and when you pull the tray of cookies out of the oven, place the chocolate C on top and press down ever so slightly.  The heat from the cookie will melt the bottom of the C to help it adhere.

And here are some of the supplies I’ve mentioned in this post, including the star punch, popcorn, and cookie cutters (for the Cinnamon Toast).

Craft Star PunchOrganic PopcornCookie Cutters

I’d love for you to share if you’ve done any of these projects with your little ones!

Follow me on Facebook and Pinterest to see my latest posts.

Have fun!

Roaming Rosie Signature