Letter C: Alphabet Activities for Kids

Letter C: Alphabet Activities for Kids at RoamingRosie.com

Welcome to Letter C Day!

If you haven’t read the Introduction to the Alphabet Activities, you should start there.

And don’t forget to check out the Letter C:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids, too!

Letter Sorting: C is for Cars {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

For our letter sorting activity, I made two paper cars.

To make it a little easier to distinguish between the capital and lowercase Cs, I cut out the capital Cs in a slightly bigger circle than the lowercase ones.

But kids tend to be more observant than us anyway, and I’m not sure that extra step was necessary.

C is for Caterpillar {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This paper project goes great with Letter C Day and with a reading of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, which we read anyway.

But instead of cutting out circles for the body of the caterpillar, I cut out large letter Cs in different colors.

C is for Counting Colorful Cats {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This is a file folder-type game that I made.  And it’s one that my daughter still pulls out of the “file folder” game binder to play.

It’s a simple concept of matching the cats that are the same color, but lets you practice counting as well as color matching.

You can find the free printout on my Letter C:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids post.

C is for Cloud Watching {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This was probably my favorite activity.

I know it seems a little strange at first glance – after all, what toddler/preschooler can pronounce “cumulonimbus?”

Honestly, I struggled to say the words, too.

But, with this chart in hand, we lay in the grass and watched the clouds.  We talked about the different shapes and which picture on the chart best matched the clouds we saw.  We picked animals out of the floating masses and laughed as the shapes fell apart again.

My daughter still excitedly points out shapes she sees in the clouds, and her younger sister is starting to, as well.

I made this chart with photos from the NOAA and you can get the free printout on my Letter C:  Free Alphabet Worksheets for Kids post.

C is for Cotton Clouds {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

After watching the clouds outdoors, we made our own.

I cut fluffy cloud shapes out of blue construction paper, which my daughter smeared with glue and covered with cotton balls.

I punched a hole at the top so we could tie a string and hang them in our living room.

C is for Constellations {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This is a great project, and for many ages, too.

The version of constellations you see here was done when my daughter was a toddler.  I made different shapes with glue and she sprinkled the cut out stars over the glue.  The stars were made with a craft punch.

Now that she’s a preschooler, we’ve replicated the project, though a little differently.  She draws the lines with a white or silver crayon on the black construction paper, dotting on glue and paper stars at important points along the path, such as where the lines intersect.

C is for Corn Sensory Bin {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This corn sensory bin was so cool.  Seriously.  Have you ever been to a corn maze where they had a giant sandbox full of corn kernels that you could play in?

This was like the miniature version of that.  With letter C toys to find.

What I’m trying to say is that it felt really neat.  Corn is a great sensory tool because it has a wonderfully soothing feel as you move your hands through it.

And you can reuse it.  This is just popcorn kernels, and we did pop them after the project was done.

The letter C items that I hid in the corn included a toy cookie, cat, car, a coin, some crayons, candles, and clothespins.

C is for Candy Cane Craft {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

The next few crafts work for both Letter C Day and for Christmas Crafts.

For this one, I had precut some candy cane shapes from red construction paper and some strips of white paper.

My daughter glued the candy canes onto the paper and the candy cane strips on top of them.

C is for Chenille Candy Canes {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

I love using chenille {pipe cleaner} sticks for crafts.  Especially since they’re something you can get at the dollar store.

For this one, we took one white and one red pipe cleaner and twisted them together.  Then, we hooked over one end to make the candy cane shape.

Mine is the one on the left and my daughter’s on the right.

If you make these around Christmastime, they make adorable decorations that can be hung on furniture or the tree.

C is for Circle Christmas Trees {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

With this one, we had some discussions not just about the letter C but also about shapes.

I drew a triangle to represent the shape of a Christmas tree on the paper and we filled it with glue.  My daughter filled the triangle with the large green circles for the tree and topped it the the star.

Then we drizzled glue over the tree and she sprinkled on the tiny circles for ornaments.

I cut out the star by hand and the green circles as well.  If you have a large hole punch you could use that instead.  For the small circle ornaments, I used a single hole punch.

And since it was winter, this decorated our fridge before I transferred it to our Alphabet Activity Binder.

C is for Cars Under Cups {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

This was a little something we did for fun, after discussing how both of the words Car and Cup start with the letter C.

A variation on a Shell Game, I hid two cars under the three cups, moved them around and asked her to find the cars.  Not much of a challenge since the cups are all different, but it was still fun.  There were lots of giggles.

C is for Cinnamon Toast Cs {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

These adorable Cinnamon Toast Cs were made by cutting the letter C out of Cinnamon Toast with a cookie cutter.

I made the toast with regular sandwich bread, buttered the warm toast and sprinkled it with my Cinnamon Sugar Mix.  Then I pressed in the cookie cutter to get letter C shapes.

And I ate all of the “leftovers.”  Of course.  :)

C is for Carrot Cake Cupcakes {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

These were quick because I used a box mix and store bought icing.  I wanted to focus on the other projects and not baking from scratch – we do that enough on other days.

I made mini cupcakes and topped them with some cream cheese icing that I put in a plastic baggie with the corner snipped off.  I squeezed it on top in circles.

Then I mixed some icing with green food coloring and a little more with orange food coloring.

To make the carrot shapes I took the orange colored icing, also in a small plastic baggie with the corner snipped off, and drew a squiggle pattern that was thicker at one end and slightly pointed at the other.  Then I added a little dab of green icing where the “carrot” was thickest.

C is for Chili Con Carne with Cheese, Sour Cream, & Cornbread {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

For dinner we had a mouthful of letter C:  Chili con Carne with cheese, sour cream, and cornbread.

I made my 4 Ingredient Chili and some cornbread baked in muffin tins.

C is for Chocolate Chip Cookies {Alphabet Activities at RoamingRosie.com}

And chocolate chip cookies.  Yum.  How could we possibly have a day celebrating the letter C and not mention chocolate chip cookies??

C is for Cookie, that’s good enough for me…..

Anyway, while baking your favorite recipe of chocolate chip cookies, melt some chocolate chips in a baggie, snip off the corner, and draw some letter Cs onto waxed or parchment paper.  Allow them to set (this only take a few minutes) and when you pull the tray of cookies out of the oven, place the chocolate C on top and press down ever so slightly.  The heat from the cookie will melt the bottom of the C to help it adhere.

And here are some of the supplies I’ve mentioned in this post, including the star punch, popcorn, and cookie cutters (for the Cinnamon Toast).

Craft Star PunchOrganic PopcornCookie Cutters

I’d love for you to share if you’ve done any of these projects with your little ones!

Follow me on Facebook and Pinterest to see my latest posts.

Have fun!

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Make Your Own Snow

make your own play snow

Some of our friends had six feet of snow in their backyards during the polar vortex.

Here in Florida, we experienced a gentle misting of ice coating our cars and grass.  Good for me (I didn’t have to abandon my flip flops) but bad for my preschooler, who still remembers romping through the snow during our vacation last winter.

Solution:  make our own snow.

I found the Erupting Snow Recipe at Growing a Jeweled Rose, and I thought it looked like a great idea:  realistic play snow and a science experiment, too!

make your own play snow

It was super simple to make, since it has only two ingredients.  My daughter even helped me mix it.

make your own play snow

You just empty some baking soda into a container (we used an old Tupperware) and mix in some shaving cream until you reach a consistency where it will form snow balls that don’t fall apart.

We used two small boxes of baking soda and what I believe was most of a can of shaving cream.

We mixed it with our hands, which is why my hand looks coated in the stuff in the top photo, but once it’s mixed, it doesn’t stick to your hand too much.

make your own play snow

And we played with it on a disposable, plastic tablecloth, to contain the mess.  And just vacuumed up any that spilled on the carpet.

Oh, and, incidentally, the girls decided that it was best to play in the snow while wearing their dress-up outfits.  Just in case you were wondering about the frilly sleeves and skirts.  :)

make your own play snow

The snow is great for sensory play.  My daughters both loved sinking their hands into it…

make your own play snow

… and their feet.

make your own play snow

And when they were tired of playing with it, I put the cover on the Tupperware and we set it aside for a few days.

Then we pulled it out again to perform our “science experiment.”

Since I often use baking soda and vinegar to clean my house, my girls had seen the fizzle they produce.  But now they were going to use their snow to create it.

make your own play snow

We made little snow balls, using our melon baller to measure them out, and then tossed them into a vat of white vinegar:

make your own play snow

*fizzle, fizzle, bubble, pop*

make your own play snow

It was a lot of fun, and a great way to incorporate discussions of the seasons into our sensory play.

And if you’re looking for more winter activities, you could try out our Crystal Snowmen!

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