How To Make Pom Pom Acorns

How to Make Pom Pom Acrons

These cute little Pom Pom Acorns are not adorning our home as festive fall decorations.

And they were SO simple – and cheap – to make!  {Have you noticed that’s a theme with me??}

Anyway, the pom poms can be picked up at the dollar store or any craft store, and the acorn tops were free.  You know:  from our yard.

The girls had fun collecting the acorn tops all around the driveway and sidewalk.  They were easiest to find in the cracks in the cement.

How to Make Pom Pom Acrons

You can see from the photo that the pom poms we used are pretty small.  Some of the acorn tops we found were even smaller, and really unusable.  I tried to pick out the largest ones, but even they weren’t terribly big.  I guess it depends on what kind of trees you have near you.

I set out the pom poms in a little art palette dish that we have, and let my daughters match up the acorn tops with which color pom pom they wanted.  This made them feel more involved in the assembly, even though I wouldn’t let them touch the hot glue gun.

How to Make Pom Pom Acrons

To put the acorns together, I squeezed some hot glue into the acorn tops and pressed the pom pom into it.

It only takes a second or two for the glue to start working.  Just be careful – if you add too much glue it will squeeze out the sides.

How to Make Pom Pom Acrons

I think these little things are just adorable!

I intended to use them mostly for decoration, but we’ve also practiced some counting and color matching with them, as well.  So if you’re homeschooling, they’re a great tool for lessons in autumn.

And as I mentioned, I usually pick up my craft pom poms in the dollar store, but if you’re having trouble find them in a store near you, here’s my recommendation for ordering some online {because you can never have too many pom poms}:

Half Pound Bag of Pom Poms for Crafts

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Fall French Toast

Fall French Toast

French toast is one of my favorite breakfast foods.

I’ve made it so many times that I usually don’t measure things, but I made sure to for this recipe.  :)  Either way, tho, feel free to adjust the measurements.

And this time, I changed things up by making it more autumn-themed.  Great for Halloween, Thanksgiving, or fall in general.

I cut up the bread with leaf and acorn cookie cutters and used plenty of vanilla extract and cinnamon in the egg mix.  Of course, you could substitute {or combine} it with almond extract, if you’d like.  {If you’re looking for something a little more fruity – check out my Tropical Almond French Toast!}

The shapes were fun for the kids {and me} but if you don’t want to go to the trouble of cutting out them out, you can still make this french toast with normal square slices of bread.

Fall French Toast

Stale bread always works best for french toast.  Fresh/soft bread tends to fall apart once you soak it in the egg mixture, and the stale bread is much easier to cut with the cookie cutters.

I didn’t have any stale bread, tho, so I laid out the bread pieces I was going to use on the counter the night before.  Let it sit uncovered and not overlapping for the best results.

I used regular sandwich bread.  A few slices of white and a few of wheat.  I happened to have them both, and I loved the combination of colors.

For each slice of bread, I got 3 medium or a combo of 3 medium and small leaves and acorns.  The extra bread can be used for croutons or breadcrumbs.

I used the Wilton Leaves and Acorns 9-Piece Aluminum Cookie Cutter Set, which you can see here:

Wilton Leaves and Acorns Cookie Cutter Set

Fall French Toast

Once you have your leaves and acorns cut out {you could also do this step the night before if it’s something you don’t think you can accomplish in the morning before your coffee kicks in}, then whisk together the other ingredients in a bowl.

Melt some butter on a griddle or in a large frying pan.  Dip the bread pieces in the egg mixture, turning to coat both sides and allowing to sit for a minute so the bread soaks everything up.

Fall French Toast

Look at all that yummy cinnamon!

I stopped using my hands to lift the bread from the egg mix and transfer it to the griddle years ago.  Too much breakage.  And messiness.  I use a fork for large slices of bread, but I used two for some of the more delicate leaves here.  Didn’t want them falling apart.

Fall French Toast

Cook them for a few minutes on each side, until browned.

I suggest dipping a few pieces at a time and transferring them all to the griddle at once, so you have a couple of batches cooking at once.

Fall French Toast

When they’re finished, you can either transfer them directly to the serving platter, or put them in a oven safe dish in an oven that’s been preheated to a low temperature to keep them warm.

I served these with just maple syrup {see photo below}, but you could also sprinkle on some powdered sugar or some Cinnamon Sugar.

Fall French Toast

Fall French Toasts {with leaves & acorns}

Ingredients:

10 slices stale bread
1 cup whole milk
6 eggs
1 tablespoon vanilla or almond extract
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

The bread is easier to work with if it’s stale, so if you only have fresh bread, leave it out on the counter the night before.

Cut leaf and acorn shapes from the bread slices. Use a combination of white and wheat for more color variation. Reserve remaining bread pieces for breadcrumbs or croutons.

Preheat a griddle to medium heat (about 350°F).

In a shallow bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, vanilla, and cinnamon.

Melt some butter on the surface of the hot griddle. Dip the bread pieces in the milk mixture, turning to coat both sides, and lifting with one or two forks so that the shapes don’t break apart. Place the bread on the griddle.

Cook for 3 to 4 minutes on each side, or until golden brown.

Serve immediately, or keep warm in a low temperature oven.

Serve with maple syrup, and optionally with powdered sugar or a cinnamon sugar mix.

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And click here to print the free PDF version of the recipe:  Fall French Toast

Enjoy!

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